Goal 10: Reduce inequality within and among countries

UNCT-GH-UNAIDS-stigmatisation-2016(Photo: UNAIDS Ghana)

Why it matters in Ghana

Inequalities based on income, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation, race, class, ethnicity, religion and opportunity continue to persist across the world, including in Ghana.

Inequality threatens long-term social and economic development, constricts poverty reduction and destroys people’s sense of fulfilment and self-worth. This, in turn, can breed social unrest, crime, disease and environmental degradation.

Most importantly, we cannot achieve sustainable development and make the planet better for all if people are excluded from opportunities, services, and the chance for a better life.

Equality for all can and should be achieved to ensure a life of dignity for all Ghanaians.

How we can help

  • We are all in this together: Don’t discriminate based on disabilities, sex, ethnic group or religion. Discourage stigmatisation from society.
  • As an active member of your community, you can support the development of your community, and join forces with your fellow citizens to be stronger.
  • Engage the youth as their voices matter; they are the future.
  • Ask who in Ghana, in your community, is at risk of being excluded and of being left behind. Which groups have little or no voice and are at risk of not being able to live in dignity, of not having basic human rights recognised and protected? Ensure that access to legal protection, health care, and jobs includes people with disabilities, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people (LGBTIs), underage sex-workers, the prison population, and injection drug users.
  • Policies to ensure the security and personal safety of all Ghanaians should be comprehensive, implemented fairly, and enforced to protect those who have little or no voice in society.
  • If you own a business, employ qualified people without discriminating based on disabilities, sex, ethnic group or religion.
  • Pay your fair share of taxes, and make sure they are used to ensure that all Ghanaians can live in dignity, free from abject poverty. Manage your business effectively to help grow the economy and increase jobs.
  • Create opportunities for women to access loans for trade; to enter non-traditional occupations, and to have equal rights to own and manage land.
  • Additionally, ask policy-makers to be careful that economic and social policies are applied fairly, and pay particular attention to the needs of disadvantaged and marginalised communities. Discriminatory laws, policies and practices need to be eliminated.
  • Safe, regular and responsible migration should be promoted, through planned and well-managed policies. 

Global Targets of Goal 10

10.1: By 2030, progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the national average

10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status

10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard 

10.4: Adopt policies, especially fiscal, wage and social protection policies, and progressively achieve greater equality 

10.5: Improve the regulation and monitoring of global financial markets and institutions and strengthen the implementation of such regulations

10.6: Ensure enhanced representation and voice for developing countries in decision-making in global international economic and financial institutions in order to deliver more effective, credible, accountable and legitimate institutions 

10.7: Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies 

10.a: Implement the principle of special and differential treatment for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, in accordance with World Trade Organization agreements 

10.b: Encourage official development assistance and financial flows, including foreign direct investment, to States where the need is greatest, in particular least developed countries, African countries, small island developing States and landlocked developing countries, in accordance with their national plans and programmes 

10.c: By 2030, reduce to less than 3 per cent the transaction costs of migrant remittances and eliminate remittance corridors with costs higher than 5 per cent

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